Don’t agree?

Please ask your wife, husband or significant other-in other words, the nearest typical consumer-to answer the following 7 questions:

  1. Does viewing pop-up ads on your computer curl your toes in orgasmic delight? Yes or No?
  2. Does a mailbox filled with junk mail cause your palms to itch and sweat with nervous anticipation? Yes or No?
  3. Do you suffer from outbursts of violent anger when a TV commercial is interrupted by a TV movie? Yes or No?
  4. Do you prance around the parking lot with ecstatic abandon whenever you find a flyer on your car’s windshield? Yes or No?
  5. Does keeping a phone next to your soup spoon on your dinner table (for fear of missing the next telemarketer’s call) help your digestion? Yes or No?
  6. Do you drink pots of black coffee at 10 pm so you can stay awake to watch 30-minute infomercials at 4 am? Yes or No?
  7. Do you drool at the thought of spending $300 on an iPhone just so you can see interactive ads on its big, cool screen? Yes or No?

Have I made my point? Yes or No?

Advertising is dead. If you’re a marketer… save your money.

Consumers have been over-advertised to and over-sold. STATE’S LATEST

Unless you’re conducting a white sale, fire sale or going out of business sale-and halving or quartering your prices-advertising won’t get you a bang, a whimper or a nickel for your buck. Not anymore.

The only ads that still earn their keep are those in newspapers and on supermarket windows that read:

Big SALE

Buy 1 Can of Campbell Soup for 89 Cents

and Get a 2nd Can-FREE!

Supplies limited!

(or something like that)

Beyond that, the first reaction most consumers have when viewing any other type ad is not to believe anything it says.

And if they have no need, desire or knowledge of you, your product or your service, their second reaction is to play basketball. Their arm and hand muscles reflexively contract, causing them to roll up your ad into a tight little ball and shoot for the nearest basket.

News is driven by speed. The media outlet that breaks the story first leads their competitors, and consumers reward those media outlets that get the timeliest news to them first.

It’s true.  When you see the scrolling banner at the bottom of the TV that says “Breaking News”, what do you do?  You stop and watch and listen.  When listening to the radio and you hear the announcer interrupt the song with a “news flash” – you immediately pay attention.  The most recent news is the most relevant, and media outlets have worked for decades to be the “first” to get the news to you before their competition.  STATE’S LATEST

Guess what?  Web 2.0 and the Internet have turned this news model upside down.  Now, instead of the news teams racing to the scene of an airliner accident to be the first with live video, and the first to interview the eyewitnesses, the first to break the news is no longer the media outlet.  The first person to break the news is the eyewitness, or even the person who was in the accident.  How? With Twitter. Twitter now breaks news at the speed of light.  Did you know that when the Continental airliner crashed into the Hudson River this year, that one of the passengers that survived the crash landing Twittered his friends, and even sent photos?  Instead of the news media outlet interviewing the survivor and breaking the news – the survivor was breaking the news himself via Twitter, with a real time update that he sent to his followers that they could then forward on.

The Internet and social media have transitioned power to the actual newsmakers, and away from the media outlets.  Does this mean that modern day media outlets will soon become outdated?  No – but it does mean that the speed of breaking news has just accelerated rapidly to almost near time information.  Twitter not only allows an individual to share news rapidly, it also is a simple way to share that information rapidly amongst a large amount of followers.   Now, rather than relying on a reporter in the field racing to the scene, the news media outlet has an army of millions of “news reporters” who can share breaking news with them instantly via Twitter as it happens. 

Twitter also provides the immediate relevancy of news that the search engines have been looking for. When you search up the terms for “Hudson river airliner crash” on your favorite search engine after hearing about the accident, you don’t want to find search results that share articles that are several years old.  The older search algorithms would often do this, as the “old news” had been indexed in the search engines and was deemed most relevant to your search.  The search engines have recognized the lightning speed of news via Twitter, and are already rewarding Twitter posts with immediate relevancy on the search engines.